Category: Staphylococcus infection

Case of antibiotic-associated diarrhea caused by Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis.

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Case of antibiotic-associated diarrhea caused by Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis.
Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2015 Jun 1;72(11):943-51
Authors: Avery LM, Zempel M, Weiss E
Abstract

Quantitative detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in patients with new influenza A (H1N1)/2009 and influenza A/2010 virus infection.

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Quantitative detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in patients with new influenza A (H1N1)/2009 and influenza A/2010 virus infection.
GMS Hyg Infect Control….

Thoracic Spondylodiscitis Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a Superinfection of Pulmonary Tuberculous Granuloma in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Case Report.

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Thoracic Spondylodiscitis Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a Superinfection of Pulmonary Tuberculous Granuloma in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Case Report.

Global Spine J. 2015 Apr;5(2):144-7

Authors: Donnarumma P, Tarantino R, Palmarini V, De Giacomo T, Delfini R

Abstract
Study Design Case report. Objective To describe a very rare case of an immunocompetent man who underwent surgery for thoracic spondylodiscitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that developed as a superinfection of a pulmonary tuberculous granuloma. Methods Posterior decompression and pedicle screw vertebral fixation were followed by T5-T6 anterior somatotomy with implant of an expandable mesh and lateral plating as symptoms worsened. During the anterior approach, an atypical resection of the left lower lobe was also performed. Results A tuberculous granuloma was detected on histology. Ziehl-Neelsen stain confirmed the diagnosis. Culture also detected MRSA. Conclusions Early medical management is the first choice for spondylodiscitis to eradicate the infection and alleviate pain. Immobilization of the affected spine segments can protect the patient from vertebral collapse and from the appearance of neurologic deficits. Surgery is suggested if there are compressive effects on the spinal cord, spinal epidural abscess, vertebral collapse, and deformity. We decided to remove the abscess and to restore the anterior column using an anterior approach. Moreover, in this case, an anterior approach allowed us to identify the etiology of the lesion and to determine the best chemotherapy regimen.

PMID: 25844289 [PubMed]

Leg ulcer and osteomyelitis due to methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus infection after fracture repair treatment: a case highlighting the potential role of prostaglandin E1 vasodilator.

Leg ulcer and osteomyelitis due to methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus infection after fracture repair treatment: a case highlighting the potential role of prostaglandin E1 vasodilator.
Infez Med. 2015 Mar 1;23(1)…

Chronic wound infections: the role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

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Chronic wound infections: the role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.
Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2015 Mar 8;:1-9
Authors: Serra R, Grande R, Butrico L, Rossi A, Settimio UF, Caro…

Sternoclavicular septic arthritis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a patient with a suprapubic catheter.

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Sternoclavicular septic arthritis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a patient with a suprapubic catheter.

BMJ Case Rep. 2015;2015

Authors: Monteiro N, Moleiro F, Lérias G, Silva AM

Abstract
We report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of fever. He had a meatal stenosis and had a suprapubic catheter for 10 months, and had a recent hospitalisation for urosepsis with bacteraemia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after manipulation of the catheter. Clinical examinations were performed in the emergency department and the patient was hospitalised with the diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infection. The following day, we noticed the development of a mass in the left sternoclavicular joint with inflammatory signs and excruciating pain. Ultrasonographic findings led to the diagnosis of left sternoclavicular synovitis, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus grew in blood cultures leading to the diagnosis of sternoclavicular septic arthritis. Treatment with vancomycin and gentamicin was started and maintained for 4 weeks with complete resolution of symptoms and no complications or sequelae.

PMID: 25694643 [PubMed – in process]

Beneficial effect of chronic Staphylococcus aureus infection in a model of multiple sclerosis is mediated through the secretion of extracellular adherence protein.

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Beneficial effect of chronic Staphylococcus aureus infection in a model of multiple sclerosis is mediated through the secretion of extracellular adherence protein.

J Neuroinflammation. 2015 Feb 3;12(1):22

Authors: Kumar P, Kretzschmar B, Herold S, Nau R, Kreutzfeldt M, Schütze S, Bähr M, Hein K

Abstract
BackgroundBacterial infections have been assumed to worsen multiple sclerosis (MS) disease symptoms and to lead to increased neurodegeneration. However, the underlying biological mechanisms for these effects are complex and poorly understood. Here, we assessed the disease-modulating effects of chronic infection with Staphylococcus aureus, a common human pathogen, on the clinical course and the extent of neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS.MethodsTo conduct this study, we established a persistent chronic infection in female Brown Norway rats by inoculating Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria in a subcutaneously implanted tissue cages.ResultsIn this study, we observed that the introduction of a localized S. aureus infection during the subclinical phase of EAE induced a chronic systemic inflammatory response, consisting of increased T- and B-cell counts and systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines. Unexpectedly, the S. aureus infection completely prevented the development of clinical EAE, and markedly reduced inflammatory infiltration and demyelination of the optic nerve, while it increased the number of surviving retinal neurons. Using a S. aureus strain that lacked the extracellular adherence protein (Eap), we determined that the extracellular adherence protein is at least partially responsible for the inhibitory effect of S. aureus infection on autoimmune inflammation of the central nervous system.ConclusionsOur results demonstrate for the first time that chronic infection with S. aureus has a beneficial effect on EAE, indicating a dual role of infection in the pathogenesis of MS. We also showed that secretion of Eap by S. aureus plays a major role in preventing autoimmune inflammation of the CNS. Moreover, we identified Eap as a factor responsible for this protective effect.

PMID: 25644616 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Cow-to-cow variation in fibroblast response to a toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist and its relation to mastitis caused by intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus aureus.

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Cow-to-cow variation in fibroblast response to a toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist and its relation to mastitis caused by intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus aureus.
J Dairy Sci. 2015 Jan 15;
Au…

Spontaneous Septic Arthritis of the Lumbar Facet Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an Otherwise Healthy Adolescent.

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Spontaneous Septic Arthritis of the Lumbar Facet Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an Otherwise Healthy Adolescent.
Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ). 2014 Jul;43(7):325-7
Authors: …

Confounding by indication affects antimicrobial risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus but not vancomycin-resistant enterococci acquisition.

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Confounding by indication affects antimicrobial risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus but not vancomycin-resistant enterococci acquisition.

Antimicrob Resist Infect Control. 2014;3:19

Authors: Datta R, Kleinman K, Rifas-Shiman S, Placzek H, Lankiewicz J, Platt R, Huang SS

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Observational studies rarely account for confounding by indication, whereby empiric antibiotics initiated for signs and symptoms of infection prior to the diagnosis of infection are then viewed as risk factors for infection. We evaluated whether confounding by indication impacts antimicrobial risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) acquisition.
FINDINGS: We previously reported several predictors of MRSA and VRE acquisition in 967 intensive care unit (ICU) patients with no prior history of MRSA or VRE who had an initial negative screening culture followed by either a subsequent negative screening culture (controls) or positive screening or clinical culture (cases). Within and prior to this acquisition interval, we collected demographic, comorbidity, daily device and antibiotic utilization data. We now re-evaluate all antibiotics by medical record review for evidence of treatment for signs and symptoms ultimately attributable to MRSA or VRE. Generalized linear mixed models are used to assess variables associated with MRSA or VRE acquisition, accounting for clustering by ward. We find that exclusion of empiric antibiotics given for suspected infection affects 17% (113/661) of antibiotic prescriptions in 25% (60/244) of MRSA-positive patients but only 1% (5/491) of antibiotic prescriptions in 1% (3/227) of VRE-positive patients. In multivariate testing, fluoroquinolones are no longer associated with MRSA acquisition, and aminoglycosides are significantly protective (OR = 0.3, CI:0.1-0.7).
CONCLUSIONS: Neglecting treatment indication may cause common empiric antibiotics to appear spuriously associated with MRSA acquisition. This effect is absent for VRE, likely because empiric therapy is infrequent given the low prevalence of VRE.

PMID: 24932407 [PubMed]

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